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CMM researchers hope to be able to replace dysfunctional brain cells

CMM researchers hope to be able to replace dysfunctional brain cells

A new study by CMM researchers supports the theory that replacement of dysfunctional immune cells in the brain has therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases like ALS and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study involved repopulating the brain with new immune cells in an experimental disease model.

- We knew that blood monocytes would infiltrate the CNS in our experimental mouse model, but we did not know to what degree they would adapt to the new microenvironment, says first author Harald Lund to KI News.

- So we dissected the process of repopulation and fully characterised what happened to these cells with time.

 

Professor Robert Harris and Dr. Harald Lund

 

The study is published in Nature Communications.

Read the full news article at KI web site.

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